Human hand and three placentas sent from Brazil to Singapore for fashion designer’s clothes

Human hand and three placentas sent from Brazil to Singapore for fashion designer’s clothes

Human hand and three placentas were sent from Brazil to Singapore so a fashion designer could turn them into CLOTHES and accessories

  • A human hand and three placentas were sent from Brazil to Singapore 
  • They were ‘for a fashion designer to turn them into clothes and accessories’
  • Indonesian designer Arnold Putra is known for creating clothes from body parts 
  • Police raided the Manaus home last week of anatomy professor Helder Binda Pimenta, who is suspected of trafficking the organs










A human hand and three placentas are believed to have been sent from Brazil to Singapore so a fashion designer could reportedly turn them into clothes and accessories.

The organs were sent to Indonesian designer Arnold Putra, whose controversial designs have included a handbag made from a child’s spine.

Police last week raided the Manaus home of Amazonas State University (UEA) anatomy professor Helder Binda Pimenta, who is suspected of trafficking the organs.

Brazilian police raided the house of an anatomy professor last week after a tip-off about potential human trafficking

Fashion designer Arnold Putra (pictured) denied he had taken part in human trafficking

Fashion designer Arnold Putra (pictured) denied he had taken part in human trafficking

The Brazilian Federal Police said: ‘According to the investigations, the accused sent plastinated human organs to Singapore.

‘Plastination is a modern technical process for preserving biological material, which basically consists of removing bodily fluids (water and fixing solutions) and fats, through chemical methods, substituting them for plastic resins like silicon, polyester and epoxy, resulting in dry, odourless and durable tissues.’

The organs have already left Brazil and were on their way to Singapore, although it is unclear whether police have intercepted the package. 

Amazonas State University (UEA) anatomy professor Helder Binda Pimenta (pictured) is suspected of supplying the organs

Amazonas State University (UEA) anatomy professor Helder Binda Pimenta (pictured) is suspected of supplying the organs

If he is found guilty the professor could face up to eight years in a Brazilian jail

If he is found guilty the professor could face up to eight years in a Brazilian jail

Brazilian police carried out their raids in Manaus, in the north west of the country

Brazilian police carried out their raids in Manaus, in the north west of the country

Arnold Pultra's handbag made from a child's spine. The designer claims his eerie product is 'ethically sourced' from medical surplus in Canada

Arnold Pultra’s handbag made from a child’s spine. The designer claims his eerie product is ‘ethically sourced’ from medical surplus in Canada

The Los Angeles-manufactured 'one-off bag', was marketed as an 'ideal statement piece'

The Los Angeles-manufactured ‘one-off bag’, was marketed as an ‘ideal statement piece’

Fashion designer Mr Putra denied he had taken part in human trafficking.

He also defended his spine bag as a ‘piece of artwork’ and said previous reports that he had obtained indigenous people’s bones and organs for his clothes and accessories were false.

Meanwhile, UEA said: ‘The rectory of the University of Amazonas complied with the court order and determined the opening of the investigation to investigate the facts and responsibilities.’

If found guilty prof Binda will spend up to eight years in jail.

A history of organ trafficking across the world 

The first reports on commercial trade in human organs date from the 1980s and concern the selling of kidneys by poverty-stricken Indian citizens to foreign patients, especially from the Middle East.

It was reported that around 80 {60a183f9ccf2aa9a251eb66c9d6148f865cf5a88149132047c88e3693afcfa59} of all kidneys that were procured for transplantation in Indian hospitals were transplanted into patients coming from the Gulf States, as well as Malaysia and Singapore.

Early evidence of EU citizens travelling abroad to obtain organs was provided by an article in the British Medical Journal in 1996, in which it was described that two German patients had died of post-transplant complications, after having been transplanted in India.

It was stated that at least 25 German patients were known to have obtained kidneys abroad.

In Europe, the Council of Europe and the European Union, through the European Parliament, are actively developing new strategies to combat and prevent what is now considered a criminal offence on a global scale.

There have been media reports that trafficking in human beings, including for the purpose of organ removal, may be increasing in Europe because of the economic and financial crisis.

It is documented that there is an increase of organ offers over the internet and in newspaper advertisements, in particular in Southern Europe and Russia.

Serious, but as yet unconfirmed reports have been circulating recently on the alleged trafficking of organs from refugees in the Syrian conflict, and their being offered on the Lebanese and Turkish ‘black market’ in organs.

Other alarming reports point to a shift of organ trafficking operations to countries in Latin America.

Source: European Union